The most honest and in-depth reviews of outdoor sports equipment on the planet.

3-Ski Quiver: Reviewers’ Choices (17/18)

Assembling a ski quiver is certainly fun, and a great way to procrastinate and make the hours at work fly by.

But it can also be a bit tricky, and we get a lot of questions about whether ski X is too similar to ski Y to hang on to both, and basically, how to think about putting together a quiver that makes sense.

So the first thing to figure out is (a) whether, for you personally, it’s worth owning more than a single pair of skis in the first place, and then (b) how to put together a group of skis that will help you get the most out of every day on the mountain.

To be clear (and like many aspects of skiing) there is no single perfect quiver for everyone. This depends very much on where you ski and how you ski. So our selections below aren’t necessarily the answer to the question, “What are the best skis out there?”, our selections below are the specific choices of several of us here at Blister, and include our rationale for why we’d choose them.

And if you’re looking for more general suggestions and recommendations (as opposed to what we personally would pick) check out our 17/18 Winter Buyer’s Guide. In the guide, we offer our thoughts on which particular combinations of skis pair well — in areas that get less snow, and in areas that get more snow — so those selections might be a useful complement to what we’ve written here if you’re still looking for general ideas, or if you already own one ski and are wondering what other skis would go well with it.

So between the Buyer’s Guide and what we have here, we hope to help you figure out (a) whether you should look into a 1-, 2-, or 3-ski quiver, and (b) give you a bit of direction on how to build your own quiver. We’ll be starting with 3-ski quivers, then narrowing it down to our 2- and 1-ski quivers in the coming weeks.

 

Four Questions

For each of our reviewers, we asked them to answer the following questions:

I. Which currently available skis would you pick for your own 3-ski quiver?

II. What skis were the most difficult to leave off your list?

III. What skis do you imagine have the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski them, or get to ski them more?

IV. If you had to choose a single brand from which to build your 3-ski quiver, which company would you pick?

 

Two Notes

(1) For our quivers, we’re only including skis that we’ve actually spent time on, but we will allow some speculation regarding skis that we think might fit into our quiver once we get to ski them / ski them more.

(2) We will be updating this post with more options from some of our other reviewers in the near future, but we’d also love to hear your answers to some or all of our four questions, too, so please do so in the Comments section.

 

NEXT: The Selections

• Jonathan Ellsworth
Cy Whitling
• Brian Lindahl
• Paul Forward

 

16 Comments

  1. Blister Member
    Bredey November 15, 2017 Reply

    FYI about the BMT series and non-Marker binding compatibility: I’ve mounted the BMT 94 (also only made for Marker bindings) with the Vipec, but used inserts and haven’t had any issues to date. I’ve put 7 days on them last spring, Expert skier, style: 160 lbs and ski in a playful directional way, but fairly hard. I’ve even subjected them to a day of resort laps in firm, cruddy snow, that was just beginning to thaw a bit and they held up. They actually skied surprisingly well for their low weight..

    You guys really should have reviewed the BMT 94 before it was replaced with the now cambered BMT 90.. The 94 is soooo much fun as a narrow touring ski for firm / spring conditions. It has tenacious grip in firm snow, you wouldn’t even know it’s fully rockered! Until you try the first ankle initiated slarve in spring corn..

    • Blister Member
      Michael November 17, 2017 Reply

      I have the Vipec mounted on the BMT 109 (no inserts) without any problems.

  2. Blister Member
    asakusuma November 15, 2017 Reply

    Great write up, I was hoping you guys would drop a quiver article this year.

    There were a few mentions of using multiple binding patterns on the same ski with inserts. Have you noticed any change in performance or stiffness when there are multiple insert patterns drilled?

  3. Smooth_operator November 16, 2017 Reply

    The love for blizzards appears to be over compared to the last couple of years…. was it that good of a snow year in the US? ;)

  4. Blister Member
    Tom November 16, 2017 Reply

    Awesome stuff. Surprised the Nordica Enforcer 100 didn’t make anybody’s cut, since it reviewed well here (and everywhere else).

    Looking forward to the A/B of Monster 88 and 98. The 88 is on my short list, but may have a bit too much overlap with the Enforcer 100 sitting in my garage.

    • Author

      Hi, Tom – I mention the Enforcer 100 and offer my explanation. It’s a fantastic ski, no question. And others will prefer it to my pick – it’s such an easy ski to recommend.

      As for the Monster 88, I personally don’t think it has too much overlap with the Enforcer 100. On really firm snow, the Monster 88 blows the Enforcer 100 away in terms of stability at speed. Whereas in deeper snow, the Enforcer 100 would blow the Monster 88 away. The Monster 88 is simply one of the best / burliest firm-snow skis we’ve been on. I’m not 100% ready to put it in the same category as the Salomon X-Drive 8.8 … but I’m about 99.2% ready to do that. It’s really, really good.

      • Blister Member
        Tom November 17, 2017 Reply

        Thanks, reading too fast and missed the Enforcer!

  5. Blister Member
    Konsta November 16, 2017 Reply

    I wish there were an Atris Freebird, but Cy, of course, meant Anima Freebird.

  6. Blister Member
    Lukas November 17, 2017 Reply

    Just wanted to say I LOVE this segment!

  7. Gwen November 17, 2017 Reply

    Pretty cool segment! Dialing in my 3 ski quiver has been a hobby of mine to kill time at work forever. It’d be nice if you mixed in a lady reviewer. I personally don’t like most skis over 115 underfoot because they drive me more than I do them. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a strong ass lady and am by no means small but still it’s often too much much ski for me. Since most of these reviews had skis bigger than that I’d like to hear some lady’s opinions. Cmon at least add one before you publish an article like this…. we are 40% of the market.

    • Author

      Hi, Gwen – glad you dig the segment. And as we noted in the intro, “We will be updating this post with more options from some of our other reviewers in the near future” so stay tuned for some of the selections from our ladies for 3-, 2-, and 1-ski quivers.

  8. Steve November 18, 2017 Reply

    Jonathan,

    The quiver section is my favorite. Quick question for you. My travel quiver is Kastle MX84 185cm and Bibby Pro 190cm. What would you choose for the middle spot the Masterblaster or the Kartel. I am 6′ 220 expert. Ski mainly Utah and Wyoming. Thanks Steve

    • Author

      Hi, Steve – for this middle ski, the more you care about its carving / groomer performance, the more I’d opt for the Masterblaster. Beyond that, you just have to make the decision: the Masterblaster is the better firm-conditions ski, but it can also handle some deeper snow – easily 6-12″, where I, at least, wouldn’t hesitate to then break out the Bibby. The Kartel 108 is going to overlap more with the Bibby, but it’s certainly a fun, all-mountain ride. So I’d think you’d want to go with it the more interested you are in — when you’re not skiing the Bibby — opting for 1 of 2 very different styles of ski, the MX84 (traditional carver) or the Kartel 108 (more versatile, way more playful, all-mountain ski). I.e., the MX84 anchors the groomer / carving side of the quiver. The Bibby anchors your deep snow / variable conditons end. Now just decide where you’re willing to overlap a bit / have zero performance gaps (MX84 + Kartel 108 + Bibby, or MX84 + Masterblaster + Bibby). Two good options, just depends now on your preferences.

  9. Blister Member
    luke November 20, 2017 Reply

    I am surprised you picked the Kartel 108 over the Wrenegade 108 given you prefer directional skis. I am assuming the bump up in playfulness of the Kartel is greater than the bump up in stability of the Wrenegade. Is that a correct assumption or were you looking for greater differentiation between skis in your three ski quiver?

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