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2013-2014 Blizzard Bodacious

Andrew Gregovich reviews the Blizzard Bodacious, Blister Gear Review

13/14 Blizzard Bodacious

Ski: 2013-2014 Blizzard Bodacious, 196 cm

Dimensions (mm): 144-118-134

Turn Radius: 32 meters

Actual Tip-to-Tail length (straight tape pull): 193.8 cm

Weight Per Ski: one ski = 2627 grams / 5.79 lbs.; one ski = 2681 grams / 5.91 lbs.

Boots / Bindings: Nordica Supercharger Ignition / Marker Jester (DIN at 12)

Mount Location: recommended line

Test Location: Niseko, Japan; Eaglecrest and Juneau Backcountry, Alaska

Days Skied: 4

[Editor’s Note: Our review was conducted on the 12/13 Bodacious, which is unchanged for 13/14, except for the graphics.]

The Bodacious was introduced last season as the biggest and baddest ski in Blizzard’s “Free Mountain” lineup. It replaced the Titan Zeus, a stiff big-mountain destroyer that might have been a little too burly for most. Even ski mountaineer and Freeskiing World Tour champion Arne Backstrom used the Zeus solely for competition; it was more ski than he wanted for everyday freeskiing.

For that, Backstrom wanted a more forgiving, all-purpose ski that still charged, and the Bodacious (which would become his signature ski) was designed to fill this role. Sadly, Backstrom passed away in a ski mountaineering accident in the summer of 2010 and never saw the Bodacious released to the general public. But he would certainly be happy to know that his ski achieved some notoriety in its first year and will return unchanged for the 2012/2013 season.

When I got this ski, one of my ex-racer friends who uses the stiff Moment Garbones as his everyday ski commented that the Bodacious hand flexed “soft” in the shovel. But soft is a relative term. While the Bodacious is somewhat soft in the shovel and tail compared to 2x4s like the Garbones or the old Titan Zeus, it definitely has a burly flex. A full-length sheet of titanal helps to create this solid flex throughout, while a smaller second sheet provides an even stiffer flex underfoot.

All this translates to the Bodacious’s impressive stability at speed and in chopped up snow, conditions in which I was able to test the Bodacious during a rare break in the snowfall in Japan. The sun had come out the day before, baking Niseko Village’s south-facing slopes. Overnight it had cooled off, and 10 centimeters of fresh snow had fallen on top of icy, refrozen chunder.

Not surprisingly, I was confidently able to make downhill-sized turns down Misushiru. I felt comfortable at even the fastest speeds I could attain on this relatively mellow run. The Bodacious provided a damp and stable ride in a foot of variable chop.

What did surprise me, however, was how forgiving the Bodacious was when I laid it into untouched snow. I could feel the ski flexing and responding ever so subtly in turns, even at rather slow speeds, and I grew increasingly confident that the ski was going to be a blast once I got it onto some bigger terrain in Alaska.

And the Bodacious certainly lived up to my expectations.

Blizzard Bodacious, Blister Gear Review

Andrew Gregovich on the Blizzard Bodacious, Juneau Icefield, AK.

My first runs in AK were basically mini heli lines, 800-foot pitches of steep, foot-deep, untracked powder in the Eaglecrest slackcountry. Arcing big turns down this face, the Bodacious made smooth, stable, and surprisingly playful turns.

When I say playful, I don’t mean playful like the Line Mr. Pollard’s Opus. But for a 32-meter-turn-radius, 196cm ski, it was surprisingly easy to slash or make slarve turns. Compared with the springy Blizzard GunSmoke, the Bodacious felt less lively, but still very smooth from edge to edge.

10 Comments

  1. BigDukeSix April 13, 2012 Reply

    I go about 220 lbs without gear. How far would you recommend I move the binding back to achieve optimum float with untracked snow?
    Thanks.

  2. BigDukeSix April 13, 2012 Reply

    Sorry,

    Vague. I mean on the 196 Bodacious?

    • Andrew Gregovich Author
      Andrew Gregovich April 13, 2012 Reply

      I don’t really see any need to move the binding behind recommended. There is already a lot of tip relative to tail on this ski. You could mount the bindings -1cm from the recommended mount postion if you usually use a very traditional mount postion, but like I say, I don’t think that it will be necessary.

      Hope that helps,

      AG

  3. BigDukeSix April 14, 2012 Reply

    Thanks. Worked great today at Alta on recommended. Are you guys using Demo Jesters, or Schizo’s?

    • Andrew Gregovich Author
      Andrew Gregovich April 14, 2012 Reply

      We are using demo Jesters. Marker’s demo plate doesn’t stick that high above the ski, which is very nice for shipping and traveling.

  4. Shred March 24, 2013 Reply

    OMG these skis are rockets – I have never ski’d on skis that accelerate quicker, are more stable and are able to stop quicker – peroid. Super G the groomers with complete confidence. Im 6-2 & weight 220 but and opted for the 186 – I was very concerned they’d be to short but was told the shorter length would be more usable in the trees and agree 100% – no reason to size up / still tons of float in the POW.

    As per binding mount position – I only ski on schizos so i can tune the position to the conditions. If you don’t have this option, mount the bindings centered / anything further back than 1cm and you’ll be sorry when you find yourself at the top of a bump run. Then again who needs to turn – these bad boys love to blast thru the crud at blistering speeds – get in, shut up, hold on – you’re in for a ride!

  5. gus March 19, 2014 Reply

    Hi Andrew, Great review as always, I would like to ask you how would you compare the Bodacious against the cochise, I mean, do you think they could coexist in the same quiver. I have a pair of 177 cochises and have been very happy with them all winter, but I feel I’m missing something in the deeper days, and since the cochise are so versatile everywhere I was wondering wether the Bodacious would be as versatile but give that little extra on the deeper days.
    In case you think they could coexist, and considering I have a pair of cochise 177 and that I’m, 5’7″ and 160lbs, what length would be more appropriate 186? and in case I dump the cochise and stick to only one wide ski, do you think the 176 would give enough float? As said before, this winter with the cochise, I’ve struggled a bit in 15″+ pow days
    Thanks in advance for your help.

  6. Shred March 19, 2014 Reply

    I thought I’d comment back to you since I have Mantras (very similar to the cochise) and i have a pair of Bodacious. The bodacious are great above the tree line – open country / in colorado big dumps. If thats the ski you want get the bodacious – you’ll be smiling ear to ear. If you want a resort / side country float i would upsize your cochise to the 180’s – you’ll get the float you’re looking for and you’ll be happy in the trees. If must have the bodacious, look for mine on CL

  7. gus March 19, 2014 Reply

    Hi Shread, Thanks a lot for your input, I mostly ski open terrain, so that will fit the bodacious well, my doubt is wether I will be able to enjoy them the rest of the time, like I do now with the cochise in order to get rid of them and stick to a one wide ski only.

  8. Blister Member
    David Dubuque May 7, 2017 Reply

    I am hopelessly devoted to my 196’s.

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