The most honest and in-depth reviews of outdoor sports equipment on the planet.

2-Ski Quiver: Reviewers’ Choices (13/14)

Two ski quiver, Blister Gear Review.

Last year, we asked our reviewers the One-Ski Quiver question: If you had to choose a single ski to handle every and any condition, what would you pick?

Tough question.

This year, we decided to make things slightly less painful and ask these Two Ski Quiver questions:

1) Which two skis would you choose for each of the following locations: Taos, Alta, Jackson Hole, Niseko, Canterbury Club Fields? (You’re allowed to pick a runner-up.)

2) What skis were the most difficult to leave off your list?

3) What skis do you imagine have the greatest likelihood of making your list, if and when you get to ski them, or get to ski them more?

And finally, the Ultimate, End-All-Be-All, No Caveats, Bottom Line, Two-Ski Quiver Question:

4) If you had to choose two skis to use for the next three years, regardless of location, which two would you choose?

 

THREE RULES, ONE NOTE:

1) We’ve only considered what we’ve actually skied.

This should, of course, be obvious, but the ski review world is a funny place. Some review publications give awards to stuff that they’ve hardly tested. We don’t. If you want to brush up on how we do things around here, check out the BLISTER Manifesto.

2) Selections must be of current skis. So Jason Hutchins can’t pick the old Rossignol Sickle, and I can’t pick the old Bibby Pro. However, skis that have undergone minor tweaks and are still currently available are fair game.

3) No company has paid us to get their ski on this list.

Blister is different. We don’t accept any money from any of the manufacturers we review. We don’t allow them to buy advertising on our website, and we don’t charge them a fee to review their skis. (Maybe that’s why our reviews don’t read like everybody else’s….)

Note: This isn’t a list of the “Best Skis Out There,” it’s a list of the best pairs of skis, as we see it. Dozens of great skis, therefore, aren’t on this list.

 

Next: The Selections

• Jonathan Ellsworth

• Julia Van Raalte

• Will Brown

• Morgan Sweeney

• Paul Forward

• Lexi Dowdall

• Jason Hutchins

• Garrett Altmann

 

37 Comments

  1. Hotmann October 21, 2013 Reply

    I currently have a 3 ski quiver. But if needed I could just take 2 of my current pairs and toss the 3rd as they are basically my really early/late season skis. But I’ll throw my hat in the ring.

    Ski #1: Liberty Helix 187 (105 underfoot). This ski can do it all. Lay down hard carves on groomers, destroy chopped up Colorado resort freshies, or be playful in the deeper stuff. Mine are a couple years old so they lack the tip rocker, but they are still really fun anytime and in any conditions.

    If I had to improve them in any way, I would add just a bit of stiffness as I love a decently stiff ski in most conditions.

    Ski #2: Moment Night Train 186. Last season I actually skied this ski quite a bit more than I expected. Even on days with no new snow. They work great for my style of skiing as I mostly look at the mountain like a giant terrain park, but when I want to charge something hard they can still handle it decently. Charging in them all day will definitely wear you out, but still doable and fun.

    I would like to try a few other skis though: Pollard’s Opus, Rocker2, something ON3P…

  2. liljedi October 21, 2013 Reply

    No two pairs on the market reward finesse, style and soulfulness as handsomely as the maestro Eric Pollard’s SFB and MPO. Line classifies them as “all-terrain freestyle,” which is accurate but incomplete. I don’t spend much time in terrain parks, but I do find both of these skis to be easy and intuitive to ride switch when the mood arises. Boasting the classiest graphics in the industry doesn’t hurt their cause either. As far I’m concerned, Line and EP owe it to humanity to keep manufacturing these designs in perpetuity.

    Ski #1: Line Sir Francis Bacon (140-108-136) – Most versatile, fun and harmonious ski I’ve ever ridden. Excels in all manner of resort conditions, including but not limited to groomers, moguls and tight trees. I’m someone who enjoys, you know, turning, so the medium-short turn radius and supple flex feel just right to me. Admittedly not the most stable setup on boilerplate or frozen crud, but their Goldilocks blend of grip, flex and maneuverability is well worth that trade-off. With a neutral, balanced stance (EP’s original -2cm mounting point is where it’s at) they can rail surprisingly fast. You can really lean waaay over into your turns. I reach for my Opuses whenever I’m guaranteed a deep day but the Bacons are a levitational dream-come-true in secret stashes ranging from 1-to-24 inches.

    Ski #2: Line Mr. Pollard’s Opus (144-118-141) – While the MPO clearly tilts in the soft/deep direction, it’s still capable and grin-inducing in a wide range of resort conditions. This is clearly not an all-mtn ski…but it could sorta kinda pass as one in higher accumulation areas, in addition to being a beast in the side/backcountry. They can surf and smear like crazy, as you’d expect from any Pollard lovechild, but they can also charge incredibly fast and aggressively through untracked snow (Exhibit A: http://lineskis.com/videos/leo-t-shreds-las-lenas) if you dare. Similarly to how the SFB blurs the line between the all-mtn and pow categories, the MPO does the same for big-mtn and pow. Float your way to gnarvana in 1-to-infinity inches.

    • Author

      “As far I’m concerned, Line and EP owe it to humanity to keep manufacturing these designs in perpetuity.”

      I like that you’ve made this a “humanitarian” issue. I think I’m going to steal that line for one of my upcoming reviews, so thanks!

  3. Maz October 21, 2013 Reply

    Canterbury Clubbies quiver of 2:
    1. Praxis Protest 187. Not fun on long traverses, but such a good ski in anything soft. Completely transcendent, and surprisingly versatile. Makes you want to ski and smile. Playful, yet will go FAST.

    2. Praxis BC 190. Lighter, and in many ways a more ‘sensible’ choice for our conditions. Does harder conditions better than the Protest, and is still a phenomenal ski in powder, crud, corn. Very high speed limit if conditions aren’t awful.

    Skis that I’d like to try, and which should go great here:
    1. Moment Governor.
    2. Praxis GPO
    3. Moment Belafonte
    4. ON3P Wrenegade
    5. Kingswood Archetype

    • Author

      Nice list, Maz. I can’t argue with those choices. Where I think the Archetype might be able to get the nod over the Belafonte is in the ‘clean carving’ department. But given the lack of groomers in Canterbury, I’m thinking about those 2 skis in pretty similar ways, assuming you’d get the Archetype in a stiff flex. And if you’re pairing either of them with a Protest, then I’d feel better about ruling out the fatter Governor, GPO, or Wrenegade.

  4. Dylan October 21, 2013 Reply

    This is good stuff! Can’t wait to hear from some of the other reviewers! I know they are probably in the works but I’ve gotta give a bump for reviews of:

    Moment Governor
    Praxis GPO
    ON3P Wrenegade

    (Nice line up Maz)

    Gotta find something worthy to replace my beat-up, de-cambered 09/10 Bibby Pros..

    • Blister Member
      Andrew October 23, 2013 Reply

      Righteous reviews & recs as always. I’d also like to bump the request for a Praxis GPO writeup. With Tabke crushing it on the FWT, I can’t wait to read what you guys think!

      Speaking of Praxis, they are the only company I’ve seen that offers very detailed measurements on their website, which is really helpful for conceptualizing the shape and design of a ski, particularly in the age of increasing variety in rocker/camber designs. While A/Bing the rocker profile pictures does help, in the age of rockered skis photos can be deceiving depending on the angle. I think it would really complement the extraordinary detailed qualitative feedback you provide, to share more specific quantitative measurements at your review introductions. I love when you guys get into the rabbit hole at times on this stuff, and I find it super helpful to have some tangible numbers to compare skis that I haven’t ridden, to ones that I have been on. For example, check out the stats on this graphic on the GPO: http://www.praxisskis.com/products/gpo.html

  5. Blister Member
    AG October 22, 2013 Reply

    I live in the PNW and ski Mt Baker and Whistler the majority of the season. The powder is thick up here, and when it comes, it gets skied out quickly. So, any ski I own needs to be able to handle deep stuff, the chop, and the icy groomers.

    #1. Rossignol sickle 186cm: This is my everyday ski. It’s an amazing all mountain ski. At 140-110-133, some may say it’s more powder oriented, but that’s what makes it great. It truly carves groomers, handles bumps, slices crud, and it’s nimble enough to hit the tight tree runs with the kids. If it’s a deep day, I still will have plenty of fun on these, but their are better skis out there for truly thick and deep snow. Which leads me to my second ski.

    #2. Nordica Radict 185cm: (157-127-146, now replaced with the Bushywayne model). This ski is may seem like overkill based on its dimensions and weight (12lbs). But it’s probably those two factors that make it crush the deep wet stuff up here. This ski can be charged through fresh powder and crud like you’re on a groomer. I’m pretty sure tip dive is impossible on these. Surprisingly, these skis actually carve on groomers too and can hold an edge on ice better than any fat ski I have owned or demoed. If the fresh stuff is gone by noon (usually earlier at Baker), you don’t need to swap skis to have fun the rest if the day. I skied these on a spring slush day last year since my Sickles had a binding malfunction and had a blast on them. The only downside is the weight of these things can tire you out.

    If I had to pick a different quiver of 2, I’d be looking at the 4frnt devastator 184 to replace the sickle and either the Faction Royale or Icelantic Gypsy to replace the Radicts. Hopefully, reviews on those are in the future.

    • Author

      Cool, AG. And yes, I want to get Jason Hutchins on the 184 Devastator ASAP. Paul Forward wrote a great review of the 194, but I want to get Jason’s take on the 184 Devastator vs. the “186” Sickle.

      • Blister Member
        Andrew January 12, 2014 Reply

        Very much looking forward to the review of the 184 devastator vs sickle- you’re reviews are very helpful and accurate- can’t agree with you more about the hell and back, and mantra. I’m considering both the devastator, sickle,, also 184 katana. I’m looking for a good crud buster with some more width than my daily driver 185 cm hell and back. I’m skiing the 2012-13 line influence 115 as my powder ski which I’m loving but wishing for a bit firmer tip to deal with the crud and broken stuff after it’s skied out. I moved to aspen for last season,, skied 60 days last season, 40yo, 5’11” , 165 lbs, like to drive the front of skis. The nordica girish sounds like my dream ski but can’t find one even used. Worried the katana won’t be as lively as I like- used to ski lots of metal, but loving the liveliness of the hell and back. I ski steep lines, trees, bumps because they’re everywhere on thiis mountain., love the feel of traditional ski like hell and back, but also enjoying the more playful feel of influence. Anyone have a girish in 185 cm for sale or recommend something that would fit between the hell and back and influence? Thanks in advance for any thoughts.

  6. Stefan October 22, 2013 Reply

    Thx for the great reviews, its the best review site I found so far on the net. There is nothing compareable in german.

    I´m looking for the second ski in my two ski quiver. I do have the salomon rocker2 122 (184cm) – Ski no 1 – I love it and last saison it was pretty much my everyday ski for 6 weeks in a row, I don´t have any problems even with moguls just carving on grommers is not that nice (the atomic bent chetler carves a lot better but I lost it in a small avalanche :-( stupid me )
    Now I need a second ski with a touring binding and I´m looking into the 105-110 mm segment. my other old skis don´t fit the bill anymore. I´m thinking about the Rossi Soul 7 – Ski No 2?? – and I was surprised that this ski is not even mentioned here (the review sounded so good). Alternatives would be the salomon 108 but its an lot heavier and I´m a more directional skier anyway, line sick day 110 but it is priced at a 100€ more, same with the blizzard cochise. The Armada Norwalk is another possibility (same price like the soul 7 and salomon 108) but its width is closer to the rocker2 122.
    I ski mostly in austria (Arlberg and Zillertal) or in switzerlands Verbier. There isn´t always powder but its not too bad either, a lot of moguls and all the regular pistes are perfectly groomed. there are some awesome spots for treeskiing, steep stuff, pillows, cliffs and its perfect for touring. So pretty much everything. The park is the only place I rarely visit and a 3 is probably the maximum I will ever do and switch skking is not my thing. I wanna have a ski with a small radius (the rocker 2 got a bigger one), I like the surfy skis but i like to bulldoze through crud as well hmmm sometimes 2 skis don´t seem to be enough but I hate it to carry more than two. Ahh I still have a month to make up my mind and i´m happy about any comments regarding the soul 7…

    • Author

      Thanks for the kind words, Stefan. As I mentioned in the Intro to this series, lots of good skis (like the Soul 7) are going to be left out of the conversation. For me, for my 1st ski, I was placing a huge emphasis on variable conditions performance (e.g., Volkl Mantra, Blizzard Cochise), and bad snow isn’t where the Soul 7 shines.

      But EVERYTHING else you say your looking for in a ski leads me to think that the Soul 7 would be a great choice for you, and a nice compliment to your Rocker2s. But you’ll be negotiating firm crud or skimming over it, not bulldozing it.

  7. Elle October 22, 2013 Reply

    Stefan last time I was in the Zillertal practically all the hire shops had the Soul 7, should be easy enough to hire to give it a go.

  8. Stewart October 23, 2013 Reply

    Kootenays BC.
    DPS Wailer 112 RP Pure 190, for anything less than boot deep. DPS Lotus 138 Pure 192, for anything deeper. Seems to work for me.

  9. KA October 23, 2013 Reply

    First off, thanks for the excellent and thorough reviews.
    I am 5-8 145, playful and agressive on skis (always pushing on the front of the boot). I’m currently equipping myself to ski, from bottom up. Skis, boots, bindings, for resort/slackcountry. My powder-only stick is a snowboard.
    I am having a hard time deciding on one ski only for pacific northwest conditions (Whistler, Stevens Pass etc,) Ideally I’d like to have something that can handle some short tours w/o too much trouble, that can be charged through the soft bumps, and still be able to bounce around the mountain in varying conditions. I’m looking at the soul7, belafonte, and rocker2 108. I tried the s7 a few years ago and really liked it, and liked the rocker 2 last year, and am considering the moment on advice only. Any suggestions? AG above likes the sickle, is that similar to the Soul 7?

    THanks

    • Author

      Thanks, KA. If you liked the S7 in PNW conditions, and if you already know you like the Rocker2 108, then I would rule out the Belafonte – one of these things is not like the others. So I think it comes down to the Soul 7 and the Rocker2 108. Keep in mind that we’ve only reviewed the 190cm, 111mm-underfoot 108. If you were going to go shorter than that, then I would likely opt for the comparably-sized Soul 7 because the Soul will be less susceptible to tip dive. See too some of my comments above on the Soul vs. 108.

  10. Mark October 23, 2013 Reply

    Hi, thank you again for another excellent review. I have a couple of questions/comments. First, could you provide a more thorough description of the typical snow conditions/terrain for each ski area? I have only skied at one of them, so posting a description somewhere would help determine which would skis would be best suited for the areas I do ski. Also, are you going to be reviewing the 2014 Super 7? From some of the other reviews I have read, it sounds like a perfect ski, but I want to get Blister’s take on it.

    Thanks

    • Author

      Hi, Mark – we will definitely review the Super 7 when we’ve got the snow to do so.

      As for the resorts, in addition to the specific reviewer comments made in this series, I’d encourage you to check out our *Blister Resorts* write ups, check out our Trip Reports from Taos, Alta, Niseko, and Canterbury, and find more specifics of the mountains in each of our reviews.

  11. Mac October 23, 2013 Reply

    I’m surprised that the exit world didn’t make your list. Do you not consider it interchangeable with the 190 bibby?

    • Author

      Not “interchangeable,” no. The Exit World is lighter, with a different core profile. And Moment’s VP / ski designer has told me that the Exit World *should* be coming in lighter than the pair we’ve reviewed. Our pair was not a pre-production pair, so I’m not sure what to make of that. But the lighter the Exit World gets, the more I can see its appeal as a touring option, but the less I’m prepared to assume that the ski is “interchangeable” with the old Bibby for resort conditions.

  12. Blister Member
    Andrew October 25, 2013 Reply

    Jonathan – are you sure Moment is actually going with the tweaked Belafonte this year? I know they debuted it at SIA, but it’s not on their website (or other websites for that matter). It’s as if they reconsidered the tweaked version. If they’ve gone back to the drawing board here, couldn’t you include the old one in your list this year? If you were to include it, where would you slot it in (Taos & Jackson)? Also, I noticed that a number Garrett’s picks this year haven’t received the full Blister treatment yet; are those in the works / planned for this year?

  13. Jeff October 30, 2013 Reply

    Despite currently owning 11 pairs of skis, the two-ski quiver, for me, is actually a pretty easy choice.

    I’m 5’9″, 140#, 28yo. Having learned to ski on straight skis, I ski pretty forward, and tend to dislike “jibby” skis with wide tails and centered mount points. Directional skier; if I’m skiing switch, something bad has happened. Strong bias towards handmade, USA built skis.

    Ski #1: 184cm Praxis Freeride
    Praxis bills this ski as one that you can take anywhere in the world, snow conditions unknown, and frankly they nailed the design perfectly. The ski has enough sidecut and forgiveness to be nimble, yet is stiff and straight enough to offer excellent stability in wide open places and at speed. It is stiff torsionally and holds a tenacious edge on hard snow. Yet, the smooth tip rocker profile provides surprising float for a ski only 107mm at the waist. I’ve skied the Freeride on everything from 2ft blower days and wide open mach speed alpine bowls to 50deg+, firm, no-fall couloirs and exposed faces. Only gripe: it lacks a bit of dampness for maching through resort chop, and will get deflected a bit compared to a heavier fiberglass ski such as the ON3P Vicik, or a metal laminate ski like the Blizzard Cochise.
    Runners up: ON3P Vicik (probably a better resort ski, but heavier and therefore less useful in the backcountry. Also, the sizing for me is awkward, as 186 is a bit long for me in tight places on this type of ski, and 176 is too short) and Moment Belafonte (an excellent choice, but didn’t wow me when demoing quite like the Praxis, though I haven’t skied the new “tweaked” version).

    Ski #2: 186cm ON3P BillyGoat
    What little the Praxis Freeride doesn’t do, the BillyGoat does. For softer days, this ski can’t be beat. I choose this over many excellent but more powder specific skis such as the Praxis Protest because in many places, consistent DEEP snowfall is not guaranteed. The BillyGoat does 90% of what those skis do, but with far more versatility. It has plenty of rocker in the tip, enough tail rocker to allow a good slarve, yet leaves enough tail to provide a good landing platform and provide some snap out of turns. But the real genius of the BillyGoat is RES. Simply put, it works. It really helps loosen up the ski in soft snow conditions, and creates a ski that never hooks in funky, variable conditions. Ever. Yet, the ski still performs well on hard snow. I’m the type of skier that, on a pow day, will probably pick a more technical and interesting and challenging line with less optimal snow rather than a lower angle, untracked line adjacent. The BillyGoat can handle this, while other more pow-specific sticks may not. The BillyGoat, like other ON3P skis, is also very damp, and rails through crud and chop with ease. However, it is heavy, and does not have the precision on hard snow that the Praxis Freeride has, which is why they complement each other so well.
    Runner up: Praxis GPO (a great ski, but a little more sidecut and a little less dampness make it less fun on resort pow days and bigger terrain).

  14. Blister Member
    robert October 30, 2013 Reply

    The volkl kendo and rossi super 7 have it covered. I ski Squaw and travel a lot. These are the 2 I take.

    I purchased the atomic automatic this summer as the only thing I would change on the super 7 is a flatter tail. As you know 2014 super 7 has a flatter tail. So we will see. I bought the automatic without demo so we will see.

    I also have shiro and squad so no shortage of skis.

    I skied the 2014 squad one run car skiing last march. Variable conditions and it was awesome. Warmed up and the squad made the mank fun.

    • Majkiman November 2, 2013 Reply

      Hi Robert,
      can you compare Squad 2013 and Squad 2014 in variable condition and powder? I can’t decide which one I should buy..thanks

  15. Elias November 30, 2013 Reply

    1) Liberty Helix. These are a crazy good everyday ski for the places listed. Fun in all areas of the mountain on any given day from hard to chopped to steep and deep. They have been my goto for years (Snowbird / Solitude primarily)

    2) Liberty Genome. At 142 underfoot they are ridiculous in any soft snow and can rail back to the lift just fine. When there is not a lot of fresh, they are skiable as long as the snow is soft, but then the Helixes do a better job at that. For 6″ or more of fresh, these come out. (It does not need to be feet deep for these guys to float and play).

    Honorable Mentions:
    * Liberty Double Helix. If this was a one ski quiver thread…

  16. Blister Member
    Andrew January 17, 2014 Reply

    Very much looking forward to the review of the 184 devastator vs sickle- you’re reviews are very helpful and accurate- can’t agree with you more about the hell and back, and mantra. I’m considering both the devastator, sickle,, also 184 katana. I’m looking for a good crud buster with some more width than my daily driver 185 cm hell and back. I’m skiing the 2012-13 line influence 115 as my powder ski which I’m loving but wishing for a bit firmer tip to deal with the crud and broken stuff after it’s skied out. I moved to aspen for last season,, skied 60 days last season, 40yo, 5’11″ , 165 lbs, like to drive the front of skis. The nordica girish sounds like my dream ski but can’t find one even used. Worried the katana won’t be as lively as I like- used to ski lots of metal, but loving the liveliness of the hell and back. I ski steep lines, trees, bumps because they’re everywhere on thiis mountain., love the feel of traditional ski like hell and back, but also enjoying the more playful feel of influence. Anyone have a girish in 185 cm for sale or recommend something that would fit between the hell and back and influence? Maybe the new line 108 Thanks in advance for any thoughts.

  17. Blister Member
    Andrew January 18, 2014 Reply

    Very much looking forward to the review of the 184 devastator vs sickle- you’re reviews are very helpful and accurate- can’t agree with you more about the hell and back, and mantra. I’m considering both the devastator, sickle,, also 184 katana. I’m looking for a good crud buster with some more width than my daily driver 185 cm hell and back. I’m skiing the 2012-13 line influence 115 as my powder ski which I’m loving but wishing for a bit firmer tip to deal with the crud and broken stuff after it’s skied out. I moved to aspen for last season,, skied 60 days last season, 40yo, 5’11″ , 165 lbs, like to drive the front of skis. The nordica girish sounds like my dream ski but can’t find one even used. Worried the katana won’t be as lively as I like- used to ski lots of metal, but loving the liveliness of the hell and back. I ski steep lines, trees, bumps because they’re everywhere on thiis mountain., love the feel of traditional ski like hell and back, but also enjoying the more playful feel of influence. Anyone have a girish in 185 cm for sale or recommend something that would fit between the hell and back and influence? Thanks in advance for any thoughts.

    • Blister Member
      Andrew January 18, 2014 Reply

      Or the new line 108?!?!.

  18. Steve January 21, 2014 Reply

    Great site guys. Torn between which pow/all mountain ski to buy. I’m 6′ 215 lbs. Go out west when I can and headed to AK next year. :) I’m a bit older than most of you but can still ski bumps and pow well. (spent a year in Steamboat and another in Squaw) Unfortunately, living in the east I never get to test out pow skis. Looking for an opinion…Blizzard Cochise?, Armada JJ or Norwalk? Maybe Nordica Helldorado? Sound off on what you guys think an aggressive advanced/expert of my size and weight would like best. I’m all ears. Thanks.

  19. Blister Member
    David February 19, 2014 Reply

    First time posting on the site and wanted to first say just how great your reviews are. Easily the best reviews available.

    I have a few questions and figured since they ultimately relate to a possible two ski quiver I would post here. I am 6’2″ about 190lbs (call it 200 with all ski gear). I purchased the 193 Automatics two years ago and at the time I weighed closer to 250lbs so the 186 seemed out of the question for me back then. I usually ski in Taos or Colorado. I like the 193 Autos in more open terrain and feel they are pretty stable for a guy my size but not a charging crud buster. I don’t mind the length in some of the open areas along West Basin and Highline Ridge but did notice that in some bumped up and tighter tree areas that the length seemed a little cumbersome. I had a similar thought when skiing some tighter trees recently in Vail and Beaver Creek.

    I was hoping the Automatic would serve as my one ski quiver but am considering a two ski quiver and ditching the Autos completely. From reading the review on the 185 Cochise the ski seems easy to ski despite its turning radius. Would you expect the 185 Cochise to be a good length for me given my measurements and where I usually ski (I should add I am hoping to make a cat skiing trip next year as well as a trip to Jackson Hole) I know the two skis are completely different but can you comment at all on the ease of skiing relative to one and other, particularly the stability and performance in steeps, tighter trees and bumps?

    As the second ski I am considering the 187 Praxis Protest. I have never been on the ski but from your review it sounds amazing. Again, I am leaning toward the 187 but wonder at my size and weight if this is the right length given the rocker profile? I would want the Protest for the possible cat ski trip but would also want it in great conditions at lift served areas so I am not really wanting to consider something like the Powderboards or Lotus 138. I noticed the Cochise/Protest was your 2 ski selection for Alta but not Taos or Jackson Hole but would you think these would be a good complement in these areas or would you recommend I take a look at anything else.

    Lastly, do you know if either Company is planning to change these skis for the 2014/2015 season?

    Thanks again for the great website and any feedback you might be able to give.

  20. Steve February 20, 2014 Reply

    anybody with any input???? I am also think about Rossi, Squad 7, Super 7 (2014only), Moment Governor (2014only), Maybe Moment Exit World. LET’S HEAR FROM YOU 190+ AGGRESSIVE SKIERS!!! PS – If I had a pair of this type of skies I would have actually taken them out in the last week!! We got like 2-3 feet around here in VT,NH!!!

    • Blister Member
      David February 20, 2014 Reply

      Steve,
      I can’t help you with many of those skis but I can give you my thoughts on the 193 Automatics. I have mine mounted at +2.5 from recommended. I would describe my skiing as moderate to fast depending on the type of terrain. As mentioned in the prior post I have enjoyed them in most types of terrain. On any soft groomers they are fun and have good edge hold. Once stuff starts to get skied out or firm I felt I needed to pay more attention (particularly at speed) as I felt the skis could lose some edge hold. This is probably more the fact that they are 117 underfoot than anything. In deeper snow they are great, provide good float for our size and pivot nicely with any speed. My biggest gripe that i mentioned was the length in tighter terrain. I am personally looking for something a little shorter to work in the tighter areas while definitely not losing any stability. If you don’t find yourself in tighter terrain or big bumps very often then I would give them a look. I can’t speak to the skis performance on big wide open faces in Alaska but I have found them capable on the steeper terrain I have been on. Hope this helps, happy to answer whatever else I can about the ski although I think the blister review on it is pretty spot on.

    • Blister Member
      Andy February 21, 2014 Reply

      Hi Steve, as a 200# aggressive skier, I’d be happy to offer some thoughts. For reference I have been spending most of my time in interior BC the past few seasons with trips to AK (Silverton Heli), UT (The Bird), CO (Highlands, Telluride, Silverton), and Jackson. My two-ski quiver is the 192cm 2014 Moment Bibby Pro and the Moment PB&J (basically a skinnier Bibby). If I’m in the backcountry I’m always on the Bibby. It is the playful charger, has a big sweet spot, is shockingly versatile thanks to its consistent stout flex pattern and mix of greater tip vs. tail rocker with adequate camber. If I’m at the resort and conditions are soft, I opt for the Bibby, as it is incredibly confidence inspiring at speed, in chop, in tight spaces, and stomping landings. It’s impressively dynamic in soft moguls to the point where I can ski a zipper line with some authoritative input, but that’s usually not as fun as must mowing over the tops of bumps, airing a turn, and continuing to charge and rack up vertical more efficiently than attacking each mogul one at a time. I’ve been on the Bibby on firm groomers, and as long as you attempt to angulate the ski, it will carve like a country ham. If conditions are firm at resort, however, I do go for the PB&J as it’s more manageable in firm bumps with deep troughs, handles variable snow well, and easily rails groomers. I was on the 193 Automatic last year, and as I posted in the comments section of the 186cm 2014 Bibby Pro, there is not one instance where I would take that ski over the Bibby. I found the Bibby far more stable on groomers (flex stays consistent into the tip rocker), much more powerful in chop, more secure on steeps (no pintail washouts), and also and perhaps most surprisingly… QUICKER. My thought on the last point there is that there is a much longer cambered section in the 193 Auto vs. the 192 Bibby. While the Bibby has a shorter cambered section, I find it to be more effective still in chop and on groomers given the flex pattern and sidecut of the ski. Secondly, even at +2.5cm on the Auto, you’re still -8cm from true center on the ski (not to mention no longer positioned over the center of the camber which I believe introduces hookiness in the tip rocker and initiates more chatter at speed but I digress). The Bibby has a mounting location at -6cm, dead in the center of the camber. Being more centered on the ski, with more tail rocker, I found it effortless to slash my tails to dump speed in pow. I could go on and on, but you get the idea. Lastly Cheers to Jonathan and everyone on the Blister team for the great reviews, I would’ve never found these skis without you guys. It has seriously upped my game. Let’s put it this way… my two closest ski buddies are now buying the Bibby after this season…

  21. Ben February 22, 2014 Reply

    Thanks for the great reviews.

    I’d love to hear what you’d choose for a 2-ski quiver for the east coast skier who occasionally takes a west coast trip.

    Thanks!!!

  22. Steve February 24, 2014 Reply

    Andy,
    Thanks for the great input on the Bibby’s. I thought the Governor may be better for me because they are a bit stiffer I’m 210-215 without a backpack, but after hearing your input I’m probably gonna just go for the Bibby in a 192. Again, I’m really only gonna use it on pow & soft days and when I get out west (definitely in AK). Being an east coast guy I will use my narrow skis most days for bumps and the typical New England “packed powder”. …….and yes I agree, I also probably wouldn’t have went for this ski if it hadn’t been for the great reviews and comments on this sight. Thanks Jonathan and everyone else at Blister. I’ll let you know how I like them as soon as I get them mounted up ………and it snows here again.

    • Author

      Thank you, Steve. And just to clarify a little bit, I wouldn’t decide on the Governor vs. Bibby so much w/r/t their flex patterns, I’d more so make the decision based on either (1) the Governor’s more locked down tail on groomers, or (2) the Bibby’s more optimized design for DEEP pow (tail rocker + more tip splay than the Governor. Happy choosing…

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*