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VP Components VX Adventure and VX Trail Pedals

Tasha Heilweil reviews the VP Components VX Adventure and VX Trail Pedals for Blister Gear Review

VP Components VX Adventure Pedal

VX Adventure

  • Body: coated aluminum
  • Axle: CNC machined chromoly steel
  • Bearing: Roller and double sealed ball bearings
  • Binring: dual-sided, adjustable tension
  • Cleat: VP-C01

Size: 90×90 mm

Claimed Weight: 472 g/pair

MSRP: $80 ($130 for the “Race” version which is lighter weight and uses higher quality bearings and seals)

 

 

Tasha Heilweil reviews the VP Components VX Adventure and VX Trail Pedals for Blister Gear Review

VP Components VX Trail Pedal

VX Trail

  • Body: coated aluminum
  • Axle: CNC machined chromoly steel
  • Bearing: Roller and double sealed ball bearings
  • Binring: dual-sided, adjustable tension
  • Cleat: VP-C01 (SPD compatible)

Size: 83.5×75.5 mm

Claimed Weight: 410 g/pair

MSRP: $75 ($110 for the “Race” version which is lighter weight and uses higher quality bearings and seals)

 

Shoes: Five Ten Kestrels

Reviewer: 5’2” 125 lbs

Bike: Scott Genius

Days tested: 3 weeks of the VX Trail, 3 months on the VX Adventure

Test Locations: Park City, UT; Salida, Crested Butte, and Colorado Springs, CO

Intro

VP Components is a Taiwanese company that manufactures pedals, headsets, and bottom brackets. For years they primarily dealt in OEM components, but branched out into higher-end aftermarket components, opening a U.S. office about five years ago.

In 2014 VP Components released their VX Pedal Series of SPD-compatible pedals, gunning for some of Shimano’s market share. The line includes the VX (cageless), VX Trail, and VX Adventure pedals, along with higher quality “Race” versions of each.

Tasha Heilweil reviews the VP Components VX Adventure and VX Trail Pedals for Blister Gear Review

Tasha Heilweil on the VP Components VX Adventure pedal.

I tested VP’s VX Trail and VX Adventure pedals to see how the VP pedals compare to Shimano’s more expensive offerings. The VX Trail is geared toward more aggressive XC riding while the Adventure is aimed at all-mountain riding.

I’ve run Shimano SPD pedals for a couple years (after switching from Crankbrothers). Many of the VP options are more affordable than Shimano and I wanted to compare the performance and and durability of the two brands.

Cleat and Pedal Interface

All VP VX pedals are SPD cleat-compatible. I rode with both the SH-51 (the standard lateral release only) SPD cleat and the proprietary VP cleats. Both work great with the pedals. I like my pedals to be tight enough to make a noticeable “click” when engaging and to not risk unintentionally releasing. But, they should be easy enough to click in and out without too much effort while riding.

I felt like the VP cleats required a slightly tighter pedal spring tension setting than the SPDs in order to obtain the same feel and they wore down a bit faster. After just a few weeks riding the VP cleats I needed to tighten the spring tension.

Tasha Heilweil reviews the VP Components VX Adventure and VX Trail Pedals for Blister Gear Review

Tasha Heilweil on the VP Components VX Adventure pedal.

The SPD and VP cleats feel very similar while riding. I have ridden primarily Shimano pedals and cleats for the past few years and found that the two companies’ cleat/binding interfaces are very comparable in terms of float (both claim 4 degrees which feels about accurate), resistance unclipping, and play between the cleat and pedal. The VP Components interface makes a slightly less audible “click” upon engaging, but it feels just as secure. They also have a slightly more abrupt build-up of resistance at the end of the float range.

NEXT: Overall Performance, My Pick, Etc.

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