2016-2017 Line Sick Day Tourist

Jonathan Ellsworth reviews the Line Sick Day Tourist for Blister Gear Review.

Line Sick Day Tourist

Ski: 2016-2017 Line Sick Day Tourist, 186 cm

Available Lengths (cm): 179, 186

Actual Tip-to-Tail Length (straight tape pull): 183.2 cm

Stated Dimensions (mm): 135-102-120

Blister’s Measured Dimensions (mm): 134-101-119

Stated Weight per Ski (186 cm): 1670 grams

Blister’s Measured Weight per Ski: 1720 & 1747 grams

Stated Sidecut Radius: 18.7 meters (179cm)

Core Construction: Balsa/Flax + Fiberglass Laminate

Tip / Tail Splay (ski decambered):  ~69 mm / ~20 mm

Traditional Camber Underfoot: ~6 mm

Factory Recommended Line: -10.6 cm from center; 81.0 cm from tail

[Editor’s Note: Our review was conducted on the 15/16 Sick Day Tourist, which was not changed for 16/17.]

Flex Pattern

Line says that the Tourist has their “Directional Flex” pattern, but the truth is (and it’s good news, in my opinion) that this directional flex is subtle. While the tails are very solid / quite stiff (call them a 8), and that solidity ramps up a bit underfoot (9), the shovels soften up a touch (7) and soften up slightly again at the very tip of the ski (6/7).

But through all of this, there are no hinge points—the transitions in stiffness feel smooth. In short, this is a nice flex pattern. It’s solid—this is no noodle—and we’re looking forward to see how it handles a variety of snow conditions, from firm and nasty to nice and deep.

Testing starts next week, and we’ll report back soon with a Flash Review on how the ski compares to skis like the Moment Tallac and G3 Zenoxide Carbon Fusion 105.

Update

Become a Blister member to access our Flash Review of the Line Sick Day Tourist.

Rocker Pics

(Click on images to enlarge)

Jonathan Ellsworth reviews the Line Sick Day Tourist for Blister Gear Review.

2015-2016 Line Sick Day Tourist, 186cm

 

 

Jonathan Ellsworth reviews the Line Sick Day Tourist for Blister Gear Review.

Line Sick Day Tourist

 

 

Jonathan Ellsworth reviews the Line Sick Day Tourist for Blister Gear Review.

Line Sick Day Tourist – Tip profile

 

 

Jonathan Ellsworth reviews the Line Sick Day Tourist for Blister Gear Review.

Line Sick Day Tourist – Tail Profile

 

 

Jonathan Ellsworth reviews the Line Sick Day Tourist for Blister Gear Review.

Line Sick Day Tourist – Bases

5 Comments

  1. Gavin December 28, 2015 Reply

    As an average sized male there’s so much choice out there for good backcountry skis it becomes almost too difficult to choose. And that’s awesome. But for my 5’4″ wife the choice sucks. The Sick Day is the perfect example: available in 179 & 186….but nothing for people of smaller stature…Please would you use any influence Blister has to persuade all ski companies that making the same skis, in the same shapes, but in shorter lengths is the right thing to do? Thanks!

  2. P.Str. June 6, 2017 Reply

    Hi Jonathan,
    I wonder which size would suite me best?
    I am 90 kg ,176 high, and will use the Tourist for say 70/30 – out/inbound skiing.
    the 179 looks short for me but is the 186 too long.
    Would the stiffer tail you talk about make up for the shorter 179 size?
    Thanks Peter

  3. Abeb October 24, 2017 Reply

    Considering the Sick Day 110 (2015) and the SD 102 (2016) – prices are in my wheel house. Any opinion on which is a better overall ski? Backdrop: I ski about 2 thirds of my time in the woods/glades of the NE, and one 3rd, of what I consider to be out west, chasing the deep at Alta, Bird, Solitude, Brighton, Jackson, GT, etc. I currently have a one ski quiver – rtm 84; which I have been bringing out west. This addition will make a 2 quiver for my home turf, and a 1 quiver for my travels. 5’8″ 180lbs, athletic.

    P.str. to answer your question….yes. The stiffer tail makes it more true to size.

  4. Abeb November 22, 2017 Reply

    Sweet. Thanks.

    Turns out the 102 will be better for me – which I believe you did not test; based on your Podcast with Jed.

    • Abeb November 22, 2017 Reply

      The in-line 102 that is.

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