2nd Look: MOMENT PB&J, 188cm

Andrew Gregovich reviews the Moment PB&J for Blister Gear Review

Moment PB&J

Ski: 2017-2018 MOMENT PB&J, 188cm

Available Lengths: 162, 172, 182, 188 cm

Actual Tip-to-Tail Length (straight tape pull): 186.3cm

Stated Dimensions (mm): 129-101-121

Stated Weight Per Ski: 2,210 grams / 4.88 lbs.

Stated Sidecut Radius: 23 meters

Core Construction: Aspen/Pine + Carbon Fiber Stringers + Fiberglass Laminate

Boots / Bindings: Nordica Supercharger Enforcer / Marker Jester (DIN 10)

Mount Location: -2 from true center

Test Location: Taos Ski Valley

(Editor’s Note: Our review was conducted on the 11/12 PB&J, which was not changed for the 12/13, 13/14, 14/15, 15/16, 16/17, or 17/18 seasons, except for the graphics.)

Moment calls the PB&J “a tasty homemade sandwich that will satisfy your one-ski-quiver appetite.” Jonathan Ellsworth got the PB&J in a wide variety of conditions, and in his review of the MOMENT PB&J, he concludes that it is “a serious contender for the best ‘one-ski-quiver’ on the planet.”

But Jonathan’s review doesn’t address the freestyle / park performance of the ski, so that is what I’m going to focus on here.

It turns out that the answer to the question, “Is the PB&J is a good one-ski-quiver for a freestyle-minded skier?” really depends on where you spend your time jibbing.

During my time at Taos I was able to sample a little bit of everything: bumps on Al’s Run and Reforma; steeps on Staffenburg and Juarez; and groomers like Lone Star and Shalako. The PB&J felt very intuitive on Taos’ varied terrain. This ski can easily make short, nimble turns, wide open super G turns, and everything in between. The PB&J doesn’t really snap from turn to turn; instead, transitioning from edge to edge feels smooth and controlled. And it is maneuverable at all speeds (so dodging the unpredictable moves of beginner skiers on White Feather and around the rest of the mountain was never a problem).

Skiing switch is nearly as intuitive as skiing forward, and it is easy to make turns of all shapes and sizes when skiing backward. This was certainly helped by the newschool mount position that is incorporated into the PB&J’s design. MOMENT recommends a -5 cm from true center mount position. I set the bindings two centimeters back from true center, and was very satisfied with the PB&J’s performance forward and switch.

Slarve turns felt smooth on the PB&J. Moment’s mustache rocker combined with the stiff flex of the PB&J allowed me to throw the ski sideways confidently in chopped up groomers and hard pack. Some freshly detuned edges certainly helped, too….

While that dulled down, park edge tune wasn’t an issue most of the time on the PB&J, it did become a concern when trying to slarve on steeper, skied-out runs like Staffenburg. After throwing the ski sideways I couldn’t get it to grip the snow and it would chatter uncontrollably until I made the next turn. When I wasn’t experiencing one of these death rattles, the PB&J certainly felt nimble enough to make quick turns and when I was able to effectively edge I felt stable and in control, even at Mach 1. On this kind of terrain the whole experience on the PB&J would have been quite positive if I had a decent edge tune.

5 Comments

  1. Simon January 18, 2012 Reply

    Disheartened to hear the poor park performance on the PB&J, but thankful for an honest opinion.

    What other skis could you suggest for a one ski quiver all mountain twin tip that is able to perform well in the park? Other than the Volkl Bridge of course..

  2. Andrew Gregovich Author
    Andrew Gregovich January 18, 2012 Reply

    There are a number of interesting skis out there that I haven’t had the pleasure of testing yet. The Nordica Soul Rider and the Line Blend are at the top of my list. I really loved Nordica’s Zero from last year. The Soul Rider is narrower incarnation of the zero so I imagine it is every bit as fun. K2’s newest version of the Kung Fujas is another ski that seems like a good one ski quiver that you could take into the park.

    We hope to get on some of these skis in the spring – stay tuned.

  3. willie August 27, 2014 Reply

    lets see, you take a 188cm ski that’s 101mm in the waist into the park and complain that it’s to heavy, then you detune the edges and complain that it has no edge grip, your a IDIOT, NO ONE would ski a 188cm ski in the park. stick to your big corporate ski brands.

    • Blister Member
      Ross June 30, 2016 Reply

      LINE has been dedicated to this type of skiing with the Blend for about 10 years, bro. Andrew was clearly testing how it held up for someone interested in using it for All Mountain Freestyle, like the Blend, the ON3P Kartel 98, and the ARVTI. There is clearly a purpose for this type of ski/ski style.

      And just a suggestion, next time you try to insult someone by claiming they’re an idiot, you may not want to appear like you yourself are an idiot within that same statement, ie “your a IDIOT”.

  4. Geoff December 10, 2014 Reply

    Little confused about the pb&j mount points. Jonathan says he mounted his 188s -4.25 cm from true center which he says is -1 from recommended mount point . The park review says that the recommended mount point is -5 from true center. These 2 statements both can’t be correct. Mounted mine +1 from factory since I have some dedicated pow skis- blister pros and govs. I hope I didn’t mount them too forward – I”d consider myself a hard charging expert- old skis include 194 belas and 190 Bobby’s which I love. Got the pbs for a more fun playful ski that I csn still step on it with. I skied the night trains for a season and couldn’t stand them in anything but knee deep untracked…ie I’m not a jib and slash type of skier.

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